Summary

In a single sentence, the “Workplace Democracy Act” eliminates one of the most popular labor law reforms enacted since 1935: The “Workplace Democracy Act” eliminates all state “Right-to-Work” laws in all 50 states.

PREEMPTING STATE RIGHT-TO-WORK FOR LESS LAWS.—Subsection (b) of section 14 of the National Labor Relations Act (29 U.S.C. 164) is repealed. [WDA, p. 7]

Through the elimination of ‘Right-to-Work’ laws in all 50 states, all workers in unionized workplaces across the United States could be required to pay union dues (or agency fees)—or be fired from their jobs!

Background

From the 1935 enactment of the National Labor Relations Act until it was amended in 1947, workers in unionized workplaces had no choice but to pay union fees.

Either workers paid the union its dues (or fees), or they were fired.

However, in 1947, Congress amended the National Labor Relations Act to give individual states the freedom to enact so-called “Right-to-Work” laws that enable workers working for unionized employers to choose whether or not to support a union or not.

In the states without Right-to-Work laws, unions are legally allowed to negotiate contracts with employers that require workers to pay union fees or be fired.

In Right-to-Work states, such agreements are prohibited.

Currently, there are 27 states that are Right-to-Work states and 23 states that allow workers to be fired for not paying union fees.

Specifically, the “Workplace Democracy Act” states:

PREEMPTING STATE RIGHT-TO-WORK FOR LESS LAWS Subsection (b) of section 14 of the National Labor Relations Act (29 U.S.C. 164) is repealed. [Emphasis added.]

If the “Workplace Democracy Act” is signed into law, unions (which already collect billions in union dues) will suddenly see their financial coffers expand with the dues and fees from individual workers who may have never wanted to pay or join a union.


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